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Tags: dumbledore

Waiting for the Dawn Treader to make an appearance. Could be awhile #TheChroniclesOfNarnia

Waiting for the Dawn Treader to make an appearance. Could be awhile #TheChroniclesOfNarnia

neil-gaiman:

abigaillarson:

Well. It’s almost Halloween, so I thought I’d take a break from work to make a festive public service announcement from Neil Gaiman.
I don’t have nearly as many fabulous escapades in graveyards as I once did, unfortunately, but this was a fun way to remember those days.

This is glorious!

Time to get prepared.

neil-gaiman:

abigaillarson:

Well. It’s almost Halloween, so I thought I’d take a break from work to make a festive public service announcement from Neil Gaiman.

I don’t have nearly as many fabulous escapades in graveyards as I once did, unfortunately, but this was a fun way to remember those days.

This is glorious!

Time to get prepared.

onegeeksblog:

Sandman Overture #2 (2013)
J.H. Williams III

Such an amazing artwork

onegeeksblog:

Sandman Overture #2 (2013)

J.H. Williams III

Such an amazing artwork

(via neil-gaiman)

meangreenmuffinmachine asked: Mr. Gaiman, how important do you feel the study of the more technical side of writing is? (Like formulaic sentence structure and learning what things like predicates and articles and prepositions are.) Is it essential to being a good writer? Respectfully yours, idontknowifishouldmajorincreativewritinghelp

neil-gaiman:

I think it’s a hundred times more important to know what something is than to know what the technical name for it is. (I can never be sure that I remember what litotes is. I think it’s using a double negative for purposes of dramatic understatement, eg “He was not unattractive.” Or zeugma, which I hope is making a verb do two or three things at once — as in “She drove away in a heartbroken condition and an elderly Ford truck.” “He lifted his spirits, his hat and her hopes.” I’m not even sure that I’ve spelled them right. And I’m not checking, because the point isn’t whether or not I’ve spelled them right, the point, if there is one, is that I know what the things being described are, and how to use them.)

How good does your knowledge of grammar have to be? Good enough to write something that’s obviously clear, understandable English. Good enough to know when you’re breaking the rules and to win an argument when you need to. 

There are great musicians who can’t read music. There are great musicians who cannot tell you the names of chords. There are songwriters and composers who need other people to come in and tell them what they’ve been doing technically, but just because they do not know the names of things does not mean that they are not doing them, or that their work is inferior to that of a different composer who does know exactly what a diminished fifth is.

Me, I’m the kind of person who reads Fowler’s Modern English Usage for pleasure. I like English, like writing in it, like understanding how it’s put together. And mostly, as I said before, I like knowing what the rules are for when I break them, because I can quietly win arguments with editors or copy editors that way.

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Miranda’s how to get out of sticky situations/ events 101. 

(Source: mettezvousalaise, via mirudders)

Tags: Miranda

"We have a rehearsal heather which is Heather Small’s face on a stick and we’d finished rehearsing and I was in the queue at Marks & Spencer and she fell out of my bag onto the floor and I just went, “Oh Heather, I’m so sorry about that” and there was silence and everyone looked at me. Then I had to pick her up and I couldn’t get her back in the bag so I was aggressively stuffing Heather Small into my bag."

— Sarah Hadland - Live with Gabby (via sarahslittleelfs)

(Source: fuckyeahsarahhadland, via mirudders)

Tags: Miranda

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